Articles on Dr. Sun & Hawaii by selected Hawaii authors

ARTICLES ON DR. SUN & HAWAI`I Selected Works by Hawai`i Authors “Sun Yat-sen’s Christian Schooling in Hawai`i” by Irma Tam Soong in The Hawaiian Journal of History 31 (1997): 151-178. “Financing Revolution: Sun Yat-sen and the Overthrow of the Ch’ing Dynasty” by Allen F. Damon. in The Hawaiian Journal of History 25 (1991): 161-186 “SUN YAT-SEN IN HAWAII: ACTIVITIES AND SUPPORTERS” by Yansheng Ma Lum and Raymond Mun Kong Lum a summary of the book (University of Hawai`i Press, forthcoming) on his life and activities from 1878-1910 Sun Yat-Sen The Man and the Myth: A Humanities Guide articles published for…

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Hong Kong: Where a Future Revolutionary Leader was Nurtured

By Francis Tsui     When Dr. Sun Yat-sen was reminiscing about his student days in Hong Kong during one of his visits to Hong Kong University in 1923, he remarked that years ago he “got the revolutionary ideas in this very place, in the colony of Hong Kong.” Skeptics may question whether Sun Yat-sen really meant what he said or was just saying this to capture and please his audience. Nonetheless, no serious study of Sun’s revolutionary background should overlook or trivialize his sojourn in Hong Kong from 1883 to 1895. Those twelve years were important fomative years in…

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Educating a Revolutionary: Sun Yat-Sen’s Schooling in Hawaii

By Alfred L. Castle     Sun Yat-sen (1866-1925) was the best known revolutionary proponent of a Chinese republic, both in China and abroad. Born of peasant stock near Canton, a cosmopolitan southern section of China, he was a Westernized Chinese. His Westernization had come from his residency and schooling in Hawaii, his medical studies in Hong Kong, and his organizational activities in the rapidly modernizing Japan. This background served him well as he traveled to gain support for China’s revolution. Sun Yat-sen’s intellectual legacy to those who followed him was fully formulated by the time of the Chinese Revolution…

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Sun Yat-Sen in China’s Heroic Tradition

By Loretta Pang     In a brief autobiography written in 1896, Sun Yat-sen asserted that he revered the sage kings Tang (reigned 1751-1739 BC?) and Wu (reigned 1121-1116 BC) from China’s distant past. As a young man, he also admired Hong Xiuchuan (AD 1814-1864), leader of the Taiping Rebellion, and identified with him to the extent that the friends with whom he discussed politics jokingly called him by that name. That Sun would single out these individuals as his personal heroes reveals as much about China’s heroic tradition as it does about Sun, who himself would become a heroic…

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The “South” in Chinese History

By D. W. Y .Kwok     In Chinese cultural awareness, the “South” is a composite term which acquired complexities and layers of meaning as her cultural geography expanded with the movement of history. Some of these meanings and connotations may be noted for the purposes of this brief treatment of the subject. First, north-to-south was from earliest Chinese history the principal orientation of any view of the south. Both cosmology and geography reinforce this view. While the North Polar Star serves as the guiding reference point of cosmic bearing, the Chinese compass has always been called “South-pointing needle (zinanzhen.)…

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Sun Yat-Sen and Hawaii

By William M. Zanella     When the Wuchang revolt of Oct. 10, 1911, the military launching of the Xinhai Revolution, broke out, Sun Yat-Sen was in America. He learned of these portentous events by reading about them in a newspaper while traveling by train from Denver to Kansas City. That the “Father of the Chinese Revolution” was abroad for one of the most momentous events in modern Chinese history is one of the many ironies of his revolutionary career. Titular leader of a revolution begun in his absence, Sun was destined to be forced to live outside of China…

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Sun Yat-Sen The Man and the Myth: A Humanities Guide

Sun Yat-Sen – The Man and The Myth   A Humanities Guide    (Courtesy of Iolani School Archives) A Humanities Guide Portrait of Sun Yat-sen, 1896. Chinese Revolution Museum Collection   Sun Yat-Sen and Hawaii by William M. Zanella The “South” in Chinese History by D.W.Y. Kwok Sun Yat-Sen in China’s Heroic Tradition by Loretta Pang Educating a Revolutionary: Sun Yat-Sen’s Schooling in Hawaii by Alfred L. Castle Hong Kong: Where a Future Revolutionary Leader was Nurtured by Francis Tsui

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Sun Yat-sen in Hawaii: Activities and Supporters

    By Yansheng Ma Lum and Raymond Mun Kong Lum   (SUMMARY) FOREWORD Dr. Sun Yat-sen, a great revolutionist, is well-known and highly respected by people of China and people all over the world. He was the Founding Father of modern China, the Republic of China. At the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, he led the Chinese people in a revolutionary movement that succeeded in overthrowing the Manchu dynasty in 1911 and established a republic government. He was elected the First President of the Republic, thus bringing to an end to more…

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Financing Revolution: Sun Yat-sen and the Overthrow of the Ch’ing Dynasty

ALLEN F. DAMON*   Financing Revolution: Sun Yat-sen and the Overthrow of the Ch’ing Dynasty   ABSTRACT Allen F. Damon. “Financing Revolution: Sun Yat-sen and the Overthrow of the Ch’ing Dynasty.” The Hawaiian Journal of History 25 (1991): 161-186. Financial and political issues were intimately linked in Sun Yat-sen’s early career because raising funds to carry out revolutionary activities was one of his principal occupations from 1894 to 1911. His persuasive rhetoric, dedication, and and integrity appealed to a broad range of people who contributed to his causes. In his fundraising he drew from family, supporters, and the overseas Chinese…

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Sun Yat-sen’s Christian Schooling in Hawai`i

Sun Yat-sen’s Christian Schooling in Hawai`i**  Abstract Irma Tam Soong. “Sun Yat-sen’s Christian Schooling in Hawai’i.” The Hawaiian Journal of History 31 (1997): 151-178. The schooling that Sun Yat-sen received in Christian schools during his first sojourn in Hawai’i (1879-83) exposed him to Western ideas and Christianity, both of which influenced him thereafter. In September 1879 Sun entered Iolani College, a boarding school for boys established by the Church of England. Boarding school life was carefully regulated and the curriculum and instruction were rigorous, but Sun did well, receiving second prize in English grammar at completion exercises in July 1882….

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